Solent Podiatry Isle of Wight Chiropody & Podiatry specialising in Biomechanics

Success Story

IOW Gazette - August 2008
This 16 year old, came to us after seeing another podiatrist. She was complaining of pain in the balls of her feet radiating up her legs, particularly bad first thing in the morning and after a long day. The pain was so bad that it prevented her from walking to school even walking around the home was difficult.

She presented with pain in both lower legs on the inside of her shin bones radiating approximately six inches above her ankle.  She explained how when she first stepped out of bed everything was fine but after only five minutes the pain gradually came on. Rest and physiotherapy helped but as soon as she started walking the pain returned.

I carried out a full biomechanical assessment and gait analysis and found her to be reasonably efficient but a little weak generally in her legs.  The major finding was the axis of motion of her subtalar joint in both feet were medially deviated creating excessive frontal plane inversion and eversion of her heels.  This resulted in excessive pronation (rolling-in) in both feet during which the heels evert excessively. Her feet were generally rather weak and hyper-mobile collapsing under the influence of her body weight causing pain under the metatarsal heads.

I diagnosed her injury as metatarsalgia due to a reduced fatty pad under the metatarsal heads and bilateral Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (shin splints).  The tibialis posterior muscle is attached along the medial (inner) side of the tibia and inserts on top of the medial arch of the foot.  If this muscle is weak and the foot is excessive pronating the medial arch collapses resulting in pain along the inside of the shin bone.  This causes micro vascular bleeding along the periosteum where tibialis posterior attaches to the tibia.  The area would be sore to touch and slightly swollen.

She was dispensed a pair of bespoke functional orthoses made from a non-weight bearing cast of her feet and advised to buy a pair of ASICS Cumulus running shoes, which offered cushioning and some stability for her new orthotics.  She was also advised to carry out strength exercises for Tibialis Posterior.  She is now walking and progressing nicely.
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IOW Gazette - August 2008
This 16 year old, came to us after seeing another podiatrist. She was complaining of pain in the balls of her feet radiating up her legs, particularly bad first thing in the morning and after a long day. The pain was so bad that it prevented her from walking to school ...
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Solent Podiatry Isle of Wight Chiropody & Podiatry specialising in Biomechanics